Top Attractions of Western Australia

April 11, 2012 by  
Filed under Attractions, Enchanting Oceania

Western Australia is one of the major tourist attraction for travelers looking for wilderness and adventure, and rightfully so. The area is huge but very sparsely populated – just 2.1 million inhabitants with almost three-quarters of them living in Perth. And yet, the area covers more than one-third of the whole Australian land mass. This is the perfect recipe for travelers looking for peace and quiet, to experience wilderness like nowhere else and re-align your tired body and mind with the nature. So, what are you waiting for? Get searching for the cheapest flights to Australia and give your stressed mind a well-deserved break in this land of adventure!

Scenic Perth

Start out your adventure in Perth, famed for its blue skies, stunning natural scenery and friendly, spirited people. The city of Perth is built on the banks of Swan River and flanked by scenic highlights such as the King Parks and the Botanic Gardens. The carefree city offers various activities and attractions – you can go parasailing over the sparkling Swan River, stroll through Kings Park and admire the city’s skyline, or visit the beach. The city is the perfect place for a holiday, and make for a great way to the start of your Australian west coast adventure.

Colorful birds and beautiful Australian wildflowers are just a few minutes away from the city center in Kings Park. Over 400 hectares of parklands and natural bush is spread for you to explore and enjoy, as well as a great spot at the top of Mount Eliza to enjoy a picnic and admire the sweeping Perth skyline. You can also visit the Aboriginal Art Gallery, or rent a bike to explore the park. The city of Perth also boast 19 metropolitan beaches, each with its own special atmosphere. These make for a great spot to watch the sunset, or to have a splash out in the waters of Indian Ocean. Some of the more popular beaches are Scarborough, Trigg, Port, and Cottesloe.

To the south of Perth is the precinct city of Fremantle, a colorful area that truly comes alive during the weekends. Street performers, fresh farmers markets and alfresco cafes dot the area, a popular quick getaway destination for local tourists. Aromas of fragrant spices wafts tantalizingly in the air as the markets hum with colorful crafts, antiques and fresh food and produce. Fremantle is easily accessible from the city, either by train or through a Swan River Cruise, and is definitely worth a visit.

Another popular quick getaway from Perth is the Peel Region, which lies less than an hour away from the city of Perth. Boasting sandy beaches and crystal clear waters of the coast to the rugged terrain of Darling Scarp, the region offers something for every type of adventure lovers. Whitewater rafting, swimming with the dolphins, hiking and trekking, all these activities and more are available in the region. There is also the popular Peel Inlet and Harvey Estuary which is known for its good fishing, crabbing and prawning.

Margaret River

Towards the south of Perth is the Margaret River region, a charming scenic landscape boasting world-class wineries and boutique breweries. But the main attraction for adventurers would be the pounding surf breaks and the spectacular scenery. Mother Nature has created an exceptional gallery here in the form of networks of underground caves, turquoise waters and rugged natural coastline. Trekkers would undoubtedly enjoy walking the various coastal trails available here, as well as pay a visit to the historic Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, situated at the most south-westerly tip of Australia with its dramatic cliffs and rocks. Explore the stalactite decorating Ngilgi and Jewel Caves, the ancient fossil remains of Mammoth Cave, and admire the Karri Trees, the third tallest trees in the world, at the Boranup Forest.

For the surf lovers, powerful waves hammer through 40 kilometers of Margaret River’s coastline, with Surfer’s Point promising excellent swells and first-class waves. There are also a boat-load of other activities available for your convenience – from water-skiing and canoeing to windsurfing and rock-climbing. This combination of great surf, fine food and wine, spectacular scenery and a naturally diverse region allows Margaret River to emerge as one of the world’s top travel destinations.

Shark Bay World Heritage Area

On the other side of Perth is the Kalbarri National Park, located on the lower reaches of the Murchison River, filled with magnificent gorges, rolling sand plains and dramatic sea cliffs. Here is the area of Shark Bay, a UNESCO World Heritage Site filled with natural attractions and travel highlights.

Visit Shell Beach, a long stretch of snow-white beach popular for swimming, beach combing and relaxing in the sunshine. The aptly named attraction is formed from millions of shells, a truly unique destination. Over the years, the shells have used to construct a number of historic buildings in the nearby town of Denham, deep in the heart of Shark Bay and springboard to various nearby attractions.

Another such attraction is Monkey Mia, one of Australia’s most talked-about destinations where wild bottle-nose dolphins swim around your legs just off the beach. Here, the beautiful beaches complement the warm sea, superb fishing and fascinating wildlife to create a electrifying destination. The Hamelin Pool is another local wonder, filled with hyper-saline water and rocks that are actually alive – they are marine stromatolites, slow growing organisms that have existed for at least 3,5 billion years.

Coral Coast

Finally, you can head towards the Coral Coast, a coastline region that is home to unique rock formations of the Pinnacles and the internationally renowned Ningaloo Marine Park, an amazing area for diving and fishing all your round. With its world-class waters filled with marine life, Ningaloo Marine Park is an Australian icon, and one of the few places in the world where you can take a tour and swim with the world’s largest fish – the whale shark.

The Marine Park covers a massive area of 5,000 square kilometres of ocean, stretching 260 kilometres from Budegi Reef near Exmouth to Amherst Point near Coral Bay. Here, you can wade into the crystal clear water at Turquoise Bay and you will be immediately within distance to reef formations that is home to more than 500 species of tropical fish and 220 species of corals, as well as dolphins, dugongs, manta-rays and turtles. Few areas in the world can match the region for its aquatic life and excellent water visibility.

This reputation as one of Earth’s last ocean paradises have seen Ningaloo Marine Park awarded numerous tourism awards, and have always been one of the more popular travel destinations in Australia. The area has also been nominated to be enshrined as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Travelers can base themselves at the small fishing towns of Exmouth and Coral Bay, both of which have retained their original flavor and a relaxed, down-to-earth vibe.

Traveling Australia – 5 Unique Ways

April 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Enchanting Oceania, Nature

Australian holidays are all about long journeys and adventurous travel. You could just lounge on the beach or have a city break in Sydney during your holiday to Australia, but you would be missing out. Australia is one of the best countries to explore on a longer journey, with vast tracts of unspoilt wilderness and an amazing variation in the scenery that you’ll encounter. Not only are there plenty of sights to see on a journey through Australia, there are numerous ways to travel.

Whether you prefer a train, a car, a horse, scuba flippers or just your own two feet, you are sure to find an Australian holiday journey that suits you. Here are five amazing ways to explore the country –

Photo credit - Mugley

Photo credit - Mugley

Ride-in Victoria

Victoria is a popular Australian holiday destination, especially for nature lovers; the dramatic and diverse landscape includes alpine mountains, arid plains and wet, temperate Gippsland. This was horse riding country back when the settlers first arrived, and this remains the best way to explore this beautiful part of Australia. There are plenty of horse riding holidays available, ranging from centre based and beginners holidays to arduous cross country trips for the more experienced rider.

Photo credit - Michael Roper

Photo credit - Michael Roper

Drive-along the West Coast

A driving holiday on Australia’s West Coast allows you to explore a wonderful and comparatively untouristed part of the country. Unlike the more populous East Coast, you can drive for miles and miles without seeing a soul, but there’s plenty to keep you occupied; on the classic route from Perth to Exmouth, highlights include feeding wild dolphins in the sea at Monkey Mia, scuba diving at Ningaloo Reef (smaller but just as exciting as the Great Barrier Reef) and exploring the stunning scenery of Kalbarri National Park.

Photo credit - t3rmin4t0r

Photo credit - t3rmin4t0r

Walk-through Tasmania

Known as “the Natural State”, over a third of Tasmania is covered by national parks, giving you an idea of just how much amazing countryside there is to explore here as part of a holiday to Australia. It is a land best seen on foot; highlights for the eager trekker include Cradle Mountain, Wineglass Bay, the Western Arthur Mountain Range and Freycinet National Park.

Photo credit - Bloody Nick

Photo credit - Bloody Nick

Catch the train-from Adelaide to Darwin

The famous Ghan train (a shortening of Afghan Express, named after the Afghan camel trains that trekked the route before the railway was built) crosses the entire length of Australia, north to south, in just 48 hours (though of course, you can make stops along the way!) Started in 1878 and not fully finished until 1929, a ride on the Ghan is an unforgettable journey for your holiday to Australia, taking in some of the best scenery the country has to offer alongside highlights like Adelaide, Darwin and Alice Springs. For train lovers on an Australian holiday, this is the journey to take.

Photo credit - brewbooks

Photo credit - brewbooks

Dive-to the Great Barrier Reef

A journey to the Great Barrier Reef may be one best measured in metres rather than miles, but it is a journey as epic as any of the other Australia holidays on this list. The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef in the world, one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World and is a scuba divers paradise.

If you go diving while on holiday in Australia, you will enter another world, a hive of biodiversity, beautiful coral reefs, and a huge variety of wildlife, including dolphins, turtles and over 1,500 species of fish. It certainly won’t be the longest trip that you’ll take while on holiday in Australia, but it will certainly be one of the most spectacular.

About the Author. Kieron Sellens. Kieron Sellens is the marketing manager of the Association of Independent Tour Operators (AiTO). With AITO’s selection of superb Australian holidays you can tailor-make the dream trip down under.


Unearthing Asia is a travel magazine focusing on Lifestyle, Culture and Attractions all over Asia. Don’t miss out on the best Cheapest All Inclusive Holidays ideas and inspirations in the region of Asia, such as this list of Bangkok’s fine dining highlights.

Capital Adventures in Canberra

December 4, 2009 by  
Filed under Attractions, Culture, Enchanting Oceania

Despite the southeast coast of Australia being the most populous and the most popular with tourists, many visitors speed by Australia’s capital city of Canberra on their travels. Others don’t even realise that Australia built Canberra in 1913 for the purpose of being a new capital to stop the rivalry between Sydney and Melbourne. But no true Australian itinerary is complete without a peek into the orderly streets of Canberra.

Photo credits - Sam Ilic Photography - STAGE88

Photo credits - Sam Ilic Photography - STAGE88


On first glance, some may find the city a little bland. Despite its straight-laced planned layout and the fact that much of it (including Lake Burley Griffin) is artificial, once you get a feel for the place you’ll quickly find the Canberra charm is undeniable.
Photo credits - avlxyz

Photo credits - avlxyz

Markets

While yes you can head for the traditional high street shopping in the commercial district, why would you when Canberra has so many fantastic Markets? There’s the Old Bus Depot Market which is held every Sunday and a great place to pick up arts and craft souvenirs for your friends and family back home. Come hungry, though, as there are plenty of food vendors offering up lunch and farms selling homemade products also offer up samples. Yum!

If antiques is your thing, you can’t miss the Canberra Antiques Centre east of the city centre in Fyshwick; it’s piled high with fun and funky clothing, art, and all sorts. I kind of feel like it’s a museum in its own right. If you go on Sunday you can also visit the Fyshwick Market. Alas if you can’t make it out to Fyshwick, then check out the Gorman House market on Saturday, which is a bit closer to town and has loads of great antiques.

Alas, if you can’t find what you need at the markets, there’s always the Canberra Centre or City Walk.

Photo credits - Christopher Chan

Photo credits - Christopher Chan

Museums

For a relatively small city, Canberra is just packed full of museums. I suggest you start at the National Capital Museum, which not only offers a great view over the city centre, it also gives a history of how Canberra came to be and more details on its planned layout.

Another must-see is the Australia War Memorial, which isn’t just a war memorial but in fact a world-class museum. It is focused on Australia’s military history, which may sound like a snooze, but the wide range of collections offer a bit of something for everyone.

Lastly, you can’t miss out on exploring both the Old Parliament House and Parliament House of Australia — even though Canberra is quite young, the parliament moved to the new building in 1988. When the new Parliament was built it was the most expensive building in the Southern Hemisphere, but once you see it you won’t question the cost. It is simply stunning, especially at night.

Photo credits - Sam Ilic Photography - STAGE88

Photo credits - Sam Ilic Photography - STAGE88


Photo credits - Sam Ilic Photography - STAGE88

Photo credits - Sam Ilic Photography - STAGE88

Scenic Views

This is Australia, after all, so there is no shortage of great views and outdoor scenery. After checking out the Parliamentary views, you should head out of town and see the view from the Black Mountain Tower, a communication tower just a few miles from town. It’s got sweeping views of the city and there’s even a café/restaurant at the top.

Back in town, head straight for the National Botanic Gardens, which has the largest collection of native Australian flora in the country. Check your travel dates to see if you can catch one of their famous jazz evenings – truly a spectacular event, they are free; don’t forget to pack a picnic!

If You Go

Being the capital, Canberra is relatively easy to reach via air, bus, or train. Check out the four hour direct train service from Sydney; it’s better than driving and you’ll pass though the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, a gorgeous spot of land, especially when the train crosses through the Molonglo Gorge.

Unearthing Asia now offers travel packages throughout the region of Asia. Check out our promotional offers of Luxury Private Villas in Bali, perfect for Honeymooners or those looking for a little romance. We also have great offers for hotels in Singapore, resorts in Phuket and many more.

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Travel Experiences.

Margaret River, Western Australia

July 31, 2009 by  
Filed under Attractions, Enchanting Oceania, Nature

After his initial submission for Photo Friday, we’re glad to see Kevin contributing once again, this time to share about his retreat at Western Australia. I hope you enjoyed it as much as we do, and remember to contact us should you be interested in contributing!

Margaret River is a little town about 4 hours south of Perth. This quaint settlement is home to numerous vineyards and farm stays, making it ideal for those who wish to get away from the urban sprawl. The region is also well known among trekking groups as winding paths bring visitors right up to nature’s door step. Margaret River is also within proximity to sandy beaches of the Indian ocean, as well as popular surfing spots.

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During our visit we stayed over at the Gilgara retreat. The retreat provides visitors with the option of luxurious modern out-houses complete with cooking facilities. Those on a budget can opt for twin rooms within the cottage-like main house for a conventional bed and breakfast experience. The Gilgara compound opens itself to visiting kangaroos and a variety of avian wildlife unique only to Australia.


This post is part of Photo Friday, a Blog Carnival held by Delicious Baby. Check them out for photo-sharing goodness, or take part in the carnival yourself.

About the Author. Kevin Moe. Kevin is a graduate student from the National University of Singapore specializing in nano-systems and fundamental research. When it comes to the bigger things in life, he can be found outdoors capturing latent perspectives and precious moments with his camera, despite his dismal collection of lenses. When it rains, he plays the piano.

Sydney’s Circular Quay

June 9, 2009 by  
Filed under Attractions, Enchanting Oceania, Nature

While (almost) everyone knows that Canberra is Australia’s political capital, the amount of tourist attractions and diversity of entertainment options available in Sydney’s Circular Quay (pronounced like “key”) makes it a capital region of a different kind. Home to two of the city’s icons – the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House – this is one of my favorite places to just walk along the shoreline and soak up the sunshine and atmosphere. Here are a few of the best experiences.

Climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Photo credit - recoverling.

Climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Photo credit - recoverling.

Walking the top of the Sydney Harbour Bridge

Walking along the lower span the bridge from one side of the cove to the other is enjoyable enough. But did you know you can actually walk along the top girders of the bridge? It is the only bridge in the world with such an offering, and its one of the safest things you can do in the city. The company running the tour, called Bridgeclimb, offers two different climbs each lasting about three and a half hours. It is such a wonderful way to spend the afternoon and the views from atop the main arch – despite being terribly windy – is surreal. The skyscrapers of the Sydney CBD seem smaller and it is practically impossible to see any pedestrians on the shore below.

This books out weeks in advance so be sure to put in your reservation well before you travel to Sydney. Sunrise and sunset tours are slightly more expensive, and for good reason – but keep in mind you can’t take your camera up with you.

The Rocks. Photo credit - kevgibbo.

The Rocks. Photo credit - kevgibbo.

Eating and Drinking at The Rocks

The Rocks is where the first settlers to land in Sydney arrived, making it the oldest part of the city. The recent refurbishments to the area have given it a bit of a sterilized feeling, but fortunately there are some tasty restaurants left to quench any hunger pains you might have. From places like Pancake on the Rocks to Löwenbräu Keller, you’ll find quite a diversity of cuisines similar to the rest of Sydney. Wolfies Grill has one of the best views barring the towering viewpoint from the Altitude Bar, which sits atop the Shangri-la Hotel on the 36th floor.

The Royal Botanic Gardens. Photo credit - chromolux.

The Royal Botanic Gardens. Photo credit - chromolux.

Sitting in Mrs. MacQuarie’s Chair

This isn’t so much a chair as a stone bench that was carved out of the rock back in 1810 for then-governor Lachlan Macquarie’s wife, Elizabeth. It sits at the end of a small peninsula that is part of the Royal Botanic Gardens, one of Syndey’s main parks. With the city skyline dominating just beyond, the gardens are full of beautiful ponds and lakes as well as the perfectly manicured flora. The end near Mrs. MacQuarie’s chair is particularly quiet and a great place to sit and reflect quietly, although I suggest sitting over near the shoreline itself, unless you want to be in the photo albums of the many tourists that come to photograph the chair.

The view from the ferry to Manly. Photo credit - george.

The view from the ferry to Manly. Photo credit - george.

When you’re Finished

After you’re done in Circular Quay, the icing on the proverbial cake is to take one of the frequent ferries out to Manly. This 30-minute (each direction) ferry service offers some of the same great views of the tourist boats but is far less expensive. Sydney is its most beautiful from the sea, so regardless be sure to get out on the waters and get some perspective.

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Experiences.

Breaking World Records in Tamworth, Australia

May 25, 2009 by  
Filed under Attractions, Culture, Enchanting Oceania

Australia is known for plenty of things – iconic architecture, unique wildlife among them – but few know about the record-breaking events that take place at the end of every January in a small New South Wales town. And the record they are trying to break puts a smile on my face every time I hear about it: the world’s largest country line dance competition.

Tamworth, Australia.

Tamworth, Australia.

This unusual feat takes place during the Country Music Festival in Tamworth, Australia. Tamworth is considered one of the world’s country music capitals – you wouldn’t overlook such a fact after seeing the massive golden guitar that announces your arrival into Tamworth. The city has hosted this event since the 1960s – it started out as just a country music concert – and in 2002 the country line dance was at its largest, including 6,744 participants. During the festival, the population nearly doubles in size – from a normal 56 thousand to over 100 thousand – as visitors come from all over the world to take part in the excitement.

Fun rodeo action. Photo credit - Brit!

Fun rodeo action. Photo credit - Brit!

Much of the excitement takes place along the main street of Tamworth. It’s packed from one end to the other with endless miscellany. If country line dancing is not your thing, fear not. You can explore a number of other “must-see” experiences, such as: tents lining the street filled with live snakes, which are poked and prodded to the cheers of the audience; a fully-fledged rodeo program, complete with several competitions and awards ceremony; kitschy arts and crafts venues, with many handmade items; and live music at any one of the bustling pubs.

Tamworth is also known as the city of lights, not because it has a glittering tower but because it was the first city in the southern hemisphere to use electric street signs. Besides the festival, Tamworth has a few noteworthy tourist attractions. Oxley’s Lookout is a scenic viewpoint perfect to spend the evening watching a sunset. The regional botanic gardens are worth a look, and don’t miss taking a quick day trip to see the old mill town of Nundle .

A scenic view from Oxley's Lookout. Photo credit - Gerald Looije.

A scenic view from Oxley's Lookout. Photo credit - Gerald Looije.

I find the festival and Tamworth itself such a refreshing experience of rural Australian culture. The locals are extremely friendly and the whole town has this exceptional buzz that even if you hate country music, you can’t help but enjoy yourself. The pubs are crazy: they stay full from lunchtime until late into the night and they often host quizzes and competitions throughout the day where you can win free drinks and other prizes. Just be sure to pace yourself – alcohol can dehydrate you quite quickly in the heat of the Australian sun.

Tamworth is approximately a 260 mile drive north of Sydney but you can also fly into directly into Tamworth on Qantas or take a Countrylink train. Hotels book up quickly during the festival so be sure to book well ahead of time – in some cases bookings are full a year in advance. Many regulars camp out at a massive caravan site arranged on the edge of town just for the event itself; as January is the peak of summer warmth, this might be a good alternative option if you want to really get a genuine feel for this event.

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Experiences.

Melbourne, Queen of the Desert

May 5, 2009 by  
Filed under Attractions, Enchanting Oceania

Melbourne was the ideal vision of what I thought Australia would be like. The airport is located out in the bush, a reddish-hued desert with hardly anything else in sight. Leaving via bus, my first glimpse of the city was the silver skyscrapers far in the distance shimmering in the waves of heat.

Thankfully, though, Melbourne not only looks good from afar but it delivers on its title as Australia’s cultural capital. Here are just of my few favorite stops when I’m in the city.

Bourke Street. Photo credit - mugley.

Bourke Street. Photo credit - mugley.

Shopping in Melbourne

I just love the cute pedestrian streets and Victorian arcades found in the Commercial Business District (CBD – or downtown city center) of Melbourne. Bourke Street Mall is lined with the major retailers, including a surprising amount of fun and funky of clothes at mass discounter Target. The Collins Street arcade is so charming and worth a stroll through even if it is just to window browse. Brunswick Street over in Fitzroy is the place to be for alternative, vintage, and edgy goods.

The pier at St Kilda. Photo credit - strandedmike.

The pier at St Kilda. Photo credit - strandedmike.

Beach-side revelries

If you can tear yourself away from the pleasures of central Melbourne, you’ll discover another piece of heaven in Saint Kilda, the city’s beach town, only a 20 minute tram ride away. As if the stunning coastal view wasn’t enough, the neighborhood is a bustling area full of cafes, pubs and clubs. Fitzroy Street is the epicenter of the action – on this one street you’ll find high end dining, cheap takeaways, and a host of other bars and coffee shops.

The Royal Park in Melbourne. Photo credit - woowoowoo.

The Royal Park in Melbourne. Photo credit - woowoowoo.

Melbourne’s Parks and Outdoor Space

Melbourne is blessed with excellent weather year-round – sometimes too good, in fact. If you’ve had enough sun or heat but still want to take advantage of the outdoors, then go explore one of the many great parks in the city. The Royal Park and Princes Park make up the largest area, and this is where you can find the zoo. But nestled around the CBD are a number of smaller and just as enjoyable green spaces – my favorites include the Royal Botanic Gardens and Fitzroy Gardens.

A wide variety of cuisines. Photo credit - avixyz.

A wide variety of cuisines. Photo credit - avixyz.

Gastronomical Affair

I’m not alone in saying that Melbourne is one of the most gastronomic-friendly destinations in the world. Thanks to a long history of migrants settling in the city, cuisines from all over the world are well-represented, including Italian, Vietnamese, Japanese, and Middle Eastern. You’ll struggle to find restaurants serving “Australian food” so opt for what the locals enjoy, such as going out for dim sum on a Sunday or visiting one of the famous Indonesian restaurants.

The majestic Twelve Apostles. Photo credit - ccdoh1.

The majestic Twelve Apostles. Photo credit - ccdoh1.

Exploring Further Beyond Melbourne

Just wandering the streets of Melbourne reveals all sorts of new and interesting sights. Let your feet lead you and see what you find – indeed many of the city’s best restaurants and bars are hidden away down alleys and dead end streets.

If you have extra time, I would recommend a day trip to the Great Ocean Road if you can, where you can see such great coastal sights as the Twelve Apostles. Further afield is the Grampians National Park, which offers great hiking and camping.

Visiting Australia? You may want to check out our list of 7 Australian Sidetrips you can enjoy, or 5 Ways to Travel Australia. We also have travel tales on the Ayres Rock and relaxing through the Riverland.

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Experiences.

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