Six Romantic Asian Backdrops

January 6, 2011 by  
Filed under Attractions, General Fun, Nature

There’s no doubt that Asian is the land of inspiration and romance. It has often been the place for honeymoons, destination weddings, one night stands and I don’t know specifically but I bet a handful of marriage proposals too! But where to go to find that spark that will make your heart skip a beat? Here are six great backdrops – but no matter where you go, be sure to head off the beaten path, walk a little further, and see if you can find that perfect spot to lose everyone else and maybe find yourself.

Photo credit - farbfilm

Photo credit - farbfilm

Halong Bay, Vietnam

I know what you’re thinking – how cliché. But try taking a sunset cruise along Halong Bay – it is one of those experiences that is hard to forget. The bay is one of Vietnam’s crowded UNESCO World Heritage sites, so why not book the junk boat that actually spends the night in the bay and get away from it all? The junk boat to Cat Ba Island is also nice and a little less overpopulated. You can get by in Halong Bay on the cheap, but don’t – spend that little bit extra and you’ll get a lot more for your money, particularly when it comes to excursions and anything out on the water.

Photo credit - nurpax

Photo credit - nurpax

Jeju Island, South Korea

One of the stops in this island will definitely make your heart skip a beat – and give you a good giggle in the process. Some things are “oh gads, only in Asia” and Jeju Loveland is one of them. It’s a theme park dedicated to sex. From the phallus gardens to the interactive exhibits (link is NSFW!), you and your lover will see in 3D every sexual position possible. Skip the kama sutra and see this stuff in action! Other than that, Jeju Island is a popular honeymoon spot for Koreans, so once you’ve had your laughs get out and explore the island’s other natural attractions. Hike towards the top of Sunrise Peak for a mesmerizing sunset, or head towards one of the many beautiful waterfalls adorning the island.

Photo credit - tboothhk

Photo credit - tboothhk

Stanley, Hong Kong

Hong Kong is great, but the hustle and bustle (not to mention the pollution) aren’t exactly romantic bliss. I prefer to cross the island and head to Stanley, a very quaint little fishing village. Spend a few hours exploring the markets, then sit and watch the sunset. It’s dreamy. Stanley has some excellent restaurants, including a few fabulous dim sum shops, so come hungry. There are some walking trails in the area and other little towns to explore, so you don’t have to spend your time confined in Stanley itself.

Photo credit - Dave B

Photo credit - Dave B

Siem Reap, Cambodia

So Siem Reap is no tourism secret – in fact, it’s so popular it is sinking back into the ground. Not cool. But hire an air conditioned van (or a tuk-tuk, if you prefer the wind in your hair and can stomach the bumpy roads) and go off exploring into the countryside. The Angkor Wat complex is absolutely massive and few tourists manage to get very far off the beaten path. It’s a shame because some of the temples are just as amazing and a sight less busy. Check out Banteay Srei, one of the more popular ones but still more quiet. The carvings in the stone are so intricate, you won’t believe it is stone. Inspiring.

Photo credit - ManojVasanth

Photo credit - ManojVasanth

Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

The state of Rajasthan in India is the country’s largest and has many unique sights to visit for romantic inspiration. From the Great Indian Desert to the hundreds of massive palaces and temples, you could spend weeks finding yourself in Rajasthan. I suggest a few special days in Jaipur, the state capital. It’s known as the pink city, and is one of India’s first planned cities. Because of this, I think, the views are just endless, from the Albert Hall Museum to the Jal Mahal or the Amber Fort. You’ll be blown away by the color and never look at the world the same. You don’t have to build your lover a temple, but you can take them to one.

Eastern and Oriental Express, Southeast Asia

Just saying the worlds orient express conjures up visions of sensual seduction while you glide across the rails. The reality is that while this is one of very few ultra-deluxe trains, there are more than one. But the Asian version is called the Eastern and Oriental Express and it has a number of routes between the cities of Bangkok, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Vientiane, and Chiang Mai. What better way to spend a romantic retreat than by tucking away into the luxury of this iconic train between visits to any of these classic Asian destinations?

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Travel Experiences.

Six Great Hikes on HK Island

July 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Nature, Uniquely Far East

I know it sounds crazy, but the bustling metropolis of Hong Kong is actually a great backdrop for hiking. Hong Kong Island has lots of hills and trails, and if you’re ready to walk off last night’s round of drinks and dim sum, then check out any of these excellent hiking trails.

Photo credit – Rob Young

Photo credit – Rob Young

Wisdom Path

This is one of my personal favourites. It’s a trail on Lantau Island (so not technically on HK Island, but close enough), which starts just behind the Big Buddha. Look for the signs (last time I was there, there was lots of construction so keep an eye out) as the trail is right there but easy to overlook. It’s about a 10 minute walk along a quiet trail before you reach the Wisdom Path, which is a circle of 38 wooden timbers with Chinese sayings carved in them, and of course some excellent views. The path goes on from here, which is part of the 70km Lantau Trail.

Photo credit - tboothhk

Photo credit - tboothhk

Hong Kong Trail

Another fantastic trail is simply Dubbed the Hong Kong Trail, and it’s one of the city’s major routes, so it’s well marked throughout. That’s a good thing because the trail winds around a 50km stretch of land, starting up on Victoria Peak and ending in Big Wave Bay. You start with great city views, with some parts of the trails right on the cliff – not for those with a fear of heights! As you go you’ll run into scenic rivers and reservoirs, and near the end the views of hidden beaches and coastal shores is unbeatable.

Check out as well our list of 10 Things to do in Hong Kong other than the Frenzied Shopping for more traveling tips and inspirations!

Photo credit - KarenDotCom127

Photo credit - KarenDotCom127

Dragon’s Back

Time Asia called the Dragon’s Back the best urban walking trail in Asia. This 5km trail runs from the edges of Hong Kong itself to a great island hang out, Shek O. The trail is named after the ridge that you cross midway, inside Shek O Country Park. From here you get fantastic views of Stanley Peninsula, Clear Water Bay Peninsula, and of course the sea. Shek O is also a great place to hang out – try one of the fresh seafood restaurants after you walk, where you can eat outside and soak up the fresh sea air.

Photo credit – Marcel Lekkel

Photo credit – Marcel Lekkel

Violet Hill Path

Another calm and relaxing walk is along the Violet Hill Path. It starts at the Wong Nai Chung reservoir and then heads around Violet Hill itself. The views just never stop – Brick Hill, Deep Water Bay, and Wong Chuck Hang, and Repulse bay, just to name a few. It’s a bit of a rocky path, so while it’s not terribly difficult, you do need to watch your footing. The trail ends at Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, and you’ll know you are close when you start to see all those beautiful streams and creeks. The entire route is approximately 7km.

Hong Kong is a megapolitan city of many facets. Explore a different side of HK, the Kowloon Side, with Andy Hayes at Unearthing Asia.

Photo credit - tboothhk

Photo credit - tboothhk

Eastern Nature Trail

This 9km trail is great not only for the scenery but for a bit of nature and historical sightseeing too. Be sure to note the signs along the way explaining flora and fauna that you’ll encounter. Heading out of Quarry Bay, the route heads up into the Quarry Bay Complex. The red brick house building here is a former sugar factory, now a nature center. If you head down along the Quarry Bay Tree Walk you’ll find some large outdoor stoves that were built during WWII. You’ll also find Sir Cecil’s Ride nearby, where Japanese invaders once landed. The route carries on through Tai Tam Country Park to the Tai Tam reservoir.

Photo credit - Ming Hong

Photo credit - Ming Hong

Lung Fu Shan Fitness Trail

Warning: only those who want to get fit need to hit this trail, the last of our six recommendations. It is only 1km long, which may seem an unlikely candidate for a fitness regime, but in fact there are twelve fitness stations along the way to make sure you get a full body workout. There are great views, naturally, as you head up from the gorgeous gardens of Pinewood Battery and head straight up. The Hong Kong Medical Association actually helped contribute to the signage and layout of this path, so it’s definitely a great choice for hangover cute or to work up an appetite for lunch.

India is another country with mesmerizing mountain attractions. Check out our 10 Stunning Mountain Attractions in India.

Health & Safety Warning

It is worth noting Hong Kong is the only place in the world I’ve visited where I’ve had a hard time with the pollution. It can be a very thick haze, and you’ll feel it when you’re out and about. Ok, so wearing one of those face masks looks absurd, but is it really not worth it if it saves your lungs?

Also, be sure to grab a map from any tourist office, so that you know where you’re going. Often the best routes start and end in different places, so you should be aware of what public transport options will take you back to your accommodation.


If you are planning a visit to Asia, don’t forget to check out Unearthing Asia, the best Asia travel portal focusing on Lifestyle, Culture and Attractions all over Asia. We have got some of the best last min Sun holidays ideas and inspirations in the region of Asia, such as this list of Singapore’s best romantic views.

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Travel Experiences.

Lost Paradise

June 15, 2010 by  
Filed under Attractions, magazine, News

web_main_banner1

Dive back into nature and uncover the beauty in the small little things that create your personal paradise. It’s time to get lost in amazing Asia.

Download PDF     Browse Online     Subscribe Now!     Past Issues

In this issue
+ Leh Ladakh
+ New Zealand
+ Yunnan
+ Puerto Princesa, the Island Life
+ Hong Kong – More than Shopping
+ Singapore Shopping Hotspots
+ Kuta Beach Getaway
+ Unusual Festivals
+ Ride Like a Khan
+ A Sense of Touch

issue_03_cover

A Rough Guide to Dim Sum

No trip is complete without trying out some of the best local food at your choice of destination. When you come to Asia, one of the must-try food is none other than dim sum, a traditional culinary art originated from Southern China that has captured the palates of many, especially in countries with strong Chinese influences such as China (duh), Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and many others around the region.

Dim sum (literally meaning, “touch the heart”) is the name for a selection of Chinese cuisine which involves a wide range of light dishes. They are usually served before noon, along with tea (also known as yum cha), but is now such a big part of the culinary scene in Asia that you can find restaurants serving them all day through. Dim sum are usually steamed, baked or fried, and come served in traditional bamboo containers. Here’s a quick guide through some of the more popular dim sum dishes.

Siew Mai

Har Gau (see below) and Siew Mai (or usually translated to Steamed Meat Dumpling) combine to form the one of the most popular pairing of dim sum dishes. I’ve eaten Dim Sum umpteen times, and never had one without at least an order of each. In fact, they are the first things my dad would order when eating dim sum. So while we ponder on what to order next, we’ll be munching on these delicious dumplings. The original Cantonese Siew Mai is usually made out of pork and mushroom, but nowadays you can find all kinds of Siew Mai to suit your preferences.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Har Gau

I personally prefer Har Gau (Steamed Prawn Dumplings) compared to Siew Mai. The skin of Har Gau is delicate and translucent, wrapped around fresh juicy shrimps to form a pouch-shaped dumpling. They are usually dipped in soy sauce, rice vinegar, or even a combination of mayonnaise and chili sauce. This dish is a crowd pleaser, so be sure to order enough so that everybody will have at least one.

Photo credit - Nate Robert

Photo credit - Nate Robert

Cheong Fun

This dish features a thin roll of rice noodles that are filled with meat, vegetables or other ingredients. Before serving, the roll is usually cut into a few pieces and a spoonful of soy sauce is poured on top. With a wide variety, this dish comes filled with shrimp, beef, char siew, or even youtiao (Chinese fried bread stick), chicken or fish. My personal favorite is Cheong Fun with Youtiao, which features fried youtiao wrapped in noodle rolls. The crispy youtiao combines well with the silky noodle rolls, melting away in your mouth with a heavy dose of soy sauce. Heavenly!

Photo credit - Wendalicious

Photo credit - Wendalicious

Baos / Buns

The most popular type of Baos (Buns) is Char Siew Bao, which simply means BBQ Pork Buns. They are soft bread with a unique texture, filled with char siew (BBQ pork) at the center of the bun. The char siew is pork tenderloin slowly roasted to achieve a tender and sweet taste, which combines well with the fine soft bread on the outside. Though Char Siew Bao is another popular dim sum dish, it is not exactly one of my favorite. As much as I enjoyed the taste very much, it is however, a very filling dish. My preference is to skip this so I can eat more of the others.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Daikon & Taro Cake

Here’s another standard pairing when ordering dim sum. They are both similar in appearance, usually cut into square-shaped slices and pan-fried before serving. This makes them crunchy on the outside, but soft on the inside. The Daikon Cake is made of shredded radish and flour while the Taro Cake is made from the vegetable taro.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Dan Tat

Dan Tat (Egg Tarts) is the Cantonese interpretation of egg custard tarts which are popular in many parts of the world. This pastry was initially introduced to compete with dim sum restaurants, but ironically they have now become part of the dim sum experience. Many variations are available, including egg white tarts, milk tarts, honey-egg tarts and even bird’s nest tarts.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Jin Dui

Jin Dui (Sesame Seed Balls) is a fried ball-shaped pastry coated with sesame seeds on the outside that is crisp and chewy. The pastry is filled usually with lotus paste, black bean paste or red bean paste. A more modern interpretation I’ve seen before are Jin Dui filled with chocolate and even durian.

Photo credit - Charles Haynes

Photo credit - Charles Haynes

Chun Juan

This is not a dim sum dish per say, as you can easily find them in various countries with differing interpretations. However, the fried version is one you would encounter in dim sum restaurants, usually filled with various meats.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Fu Pi Quan

This dish is similar to Spring Rolls, with the main difference being the outer layer of the dish is made of tofu skin. Just like Spring Rolls, you can find the fried and steamed versions, with various meat fillings inside of it.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Fung Jeow

Phoenix Talons is the fancy way of translating this dish name, which is usually just called Chicken Feet by non-Chinese speaking eaters (like yours truly). The chicken feet are first deep fried or steamed to make them puffy, and then stewed and marinated in flavored black bean sauce. The result is a dish that is moist, tender and flavorful, though it does consists of many small bones.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz

Lo Mai Gai

The English translation to this dish is quite a handful – Steamed Glutinous Rice in Lotus Leaf Wrap. It features glutinous rice filled with chicken meat and various vegetables, which is then wrapped in a dried lotus leaf and steamed. The result is a savory and flavorful dish, with the aroma of the lotus leaf and chicken melting into the sticky glutinous rice. A personal favorite.

Photo credit - Jason Lam

Photo credit - Jason Lam

Almond Jelly

This is a common dessert made of sweet Chinese almond. Almond milk is extracted, sweetened and then heated with a gelling agent. It is then chilled to create a tofu like pudding with a sweet almond taste.

Photo credit - jetalone

Photo credit - jetalone

Mango Pudding

Last but definitely not least, is one of my favorite dessert – the Mango Pudding. This is the perfect way to end your feast, a simple dessert that captures the glorious flavor of mangoes like no other. When done well, the pudding is silky smooth in texture, rich in flavor and refreshing in taste.

Photo credit - avlxyz

Photo credit - avlxyz


This post is part of WanderFood Wednesday, a Blog Carnival held by Wanderlust & Lipstick. Check them out for a visual treat of tasty dishes, or take part in the carnival yourself. Additionally, do check out as well our latest offering, our new Issue 02 of the magazine!


If you are planning a visit to Asia, don’t forget to check out Unearthing Asia, the best Asia travel portal focusing on Lifestyle, Culture and Attractions all over Asia. We have got some of the best travel ideas and inspirations in the region of Asia, such as this list of Singapore’s best romantic views. You can also find some information on cheap holidays to kavos here.

Mango Sago – Hong Kong Goodness in Singapore

December 22, 2009 by  
Filed under Exotic South East, Gourmet

Nobody is entirely sure where the dessert goodness of the Mango Sago originated from. Hong Kong is probably as good a guess as any, with the famed Hui Lao Shan dessert shop sprouting in the island-state at a rate reminiscent to that of Starbucks in the USA.

This dessert is now a personal favorite of mine whenever visiting Singapore, where a host of traditional dessert stall has upped the ante, producing local creative mixtures combining various old-school ingredients. My own preferences however, still lies with the original – a flavorful mixture of sweet mangoes, hearty sago and refreshing pomelo.

Mango Sago goodness. Photo credit - Eugene.

Mango Sago goodness. Photo credit - Eugene.

Pictured above is the personal favorite I proudly proclaimed earlier on, Mango Sago with Pomelo. First timers would do well to try the original favorite before testing out other more creative creations, such as a combination of Mango Sago with Green Tea Ice Cream, or Mango Sago with Grass Jelly, amongst others. These tasty desserts make for a refreshing and much needed after lunch boost, to prep you up for the next half of the work-day ahead!

Recommended

Tong Shui Desserts
People’s Park Centre
Another popular stall. During weekends, they would sell out by 6pm, a good 2 hours before closing time.

Summer Palace at the Regent Singapore. Hua Ting at the Orchard Hotel and Lei Garden at CHIJMES, are but a few high-end restaurants where you can also enjoy this traditional dessert.

Mei Heong Yuen Desserts
65-67 Temple Street, Chinatown
Come early or risk missing out. This stall is a popular with the office workers around the area, and are usually crowded out by 8pm, right after dinner time.

Ah Chew’s Dessert
At Liang Seah St, across Bugis Junction
A hidden jewel that has been discovered by working adults and teenagers alike.


This post is part of WanderFood Wednesday, a Blog Carnival held by Wanderlust & Lipstick.
Check them out for a visual treat of tasty dishes, or take part in the carnival yourself!

About the Author. Nikolas Tjhin. A graphic and web designer in its previous incarnation, Nik’s journeyman career has seen him do work for various creative studios in Wisconsin, Minneapolis, Singapore and Jakarta. Now, he’s settled down for the time being and focusing his efforts as the editor of an Asia travel zine, Unearthing Asia.

Exploring the Kowloon Side of HK

May 18, 2009 by  
Filed under Culture, General Fun, Uniquely Far East

Hong Kong is, without a doubt, my favorite city in Asia. The melding of east-meets-west, the unbelievable craziness of the atmosphere, the ‘buzz’ – nothing beats it. One of my favorite thing to do on any Hong Kong trip is wander about the streets on the Kowloon side. It is a sensory experience in itself – the pungent smell of XO sauce permeating the air, cars and motorbikes buzzing by, the sidewalks well lit at night by neon. Here are a few of the places I in Kowloon I’ve always enjoyed exploring.

Kowloon City Park. Photo credit - MoreThanReal.

Kowloon City Park. Photo credit - MoreThanReal.

Kowloon Walled City Park

This seemingly tranquil park is a significant historical location. This was a Chinese fortification used to protect Kowloon Bay and was an important defense mechanism during the British takeover of Hong Kong Island in the year 1841.

When the New Territories were leased to Britain in 1898, this walled fortress remained stationed with Chinese soldiers; a year later they were forced out by the British but due to a loophole in the law, this tiny parcel of land fell into a “limbo”, technically not under jurisdiction of neither China nor Britain. Behind the remaining fortress walls, a miniature city developed, full of slums and illicit activity. It was only in 1994 that the city was demolished and the gorgeous park that we see today was built.

Neon chaos at Nathan Road. Photo credit - JoopDorreSteijn.

Neon chaos at Nathan Road. Photo credit - JoopDorreSteijn.

Nathan Road

The first road built in Kowloon after the British takeover was Nathan Road. It was originally called the Golden Mile, and to me it still is. It’s lined on both sides with various shops and tacky restaurants, and the neon signs go up several stories. While the MTR runs partially underneath Nathan Road and is the traditional form of transport, I’d rather just walk the couple of miles from Mong Kok to Tsim Sha Tsui and poke my head in some of the shops or vendors selling their wares. They are not as cheap as in the markets but the displays are interesting, nonetheless.

Temple Street night market. Photo credit - Savannah Grandfather.

Temple Street night market. Photo credit - Savannah Grandfather.

Colorful products! Photo credit - Andy Hayes.

Colorful products! Photo credit - Andy Hayes.

The Markets

Oh, yes, the famous markets. Any tale about Kowloon would be remiss not to mention them. My preferred shopping detour is the Night Market, on Temple Street. Be sure to explore the portion north of Jordan Road, beyond past the famous fortune tellers – the stalls continue some of the best deals are had at this end.

To help your stamina, be brave and have a snack at one of the adjacent stalls on the market. No, there usually isn’t an English menu but typically one of the staff on duty speaks decent English and will help you choose. You can’t go wrong with noodles or seafood.

The sunset view from the Star Ferry terminal. Photo credit - slack12.

The sunset view from the Star Ferry terminal. Photo credit - slack12.

A Symphony of Light. Photo credit - Steve Webel.

A Symphony of Light. Photo credit - Steve Webel.

Getting Back to Hong Kong Island

The best method of travel between Hong Kong and Kowloon is the Star Ferry. It’s so cheap it is almost free, you get some fresh air (which is in limited supply in Hong Kong, without a doubt), and the views are fantastic. However, if you happen to be in the area around 7:45PM, be sure to call ahead and book yourself onto the junk boat cruise.

Why 7:45? Because this is the tour that has the honor of enjoying the 8PM light show, the Symphony of Lights. Sure, it is somewhat cheesy – particularly the musical accompaniment – but sitting on the boat in the middle of Hong Kong harbor, it feels as if the dazzling skyline in front of you stretches around the earth. All this experiences are combined to create what is often praised as the cheapest multi-cultural, multi-sensory cruise experience in the world!

Heading to Hong Kong? You would probably enjoyour other HK-related guides – Hong Kong Street Food and 10 Things to do in HK (other than Shopping)!

About the Author. Andy Hayes. Andy Hayes is a freelance travel writer and photographer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. When not crossing the world to have his next Asian travel adventures, he is hitting the walking trails near home. To get in touch or see Andy’s other travelogues, visit his website, Sharing Experiences.

Hong Kong Local Eats

April 9, 2009 by  
Filed under Feature Highlights, Gourmet, Uniquely Far East

Early last year I had the chance to spend some time vacationing in Hong Kong. One of the things that I truly enjoyed there was the avalanche of option you have for food. I had the chance to try a plethora of local and non-local cuisines, and was deeply impressed by the wide array of variety. I’d like to share here are some of the favorite local eats I’ve had the chance to taste. Mind you, these are just the local eats, I’ve tried plenty other food as well, such as Japanese, Italian, Korean and the usual Western.

Wanton Mee

My very first meal was at this wanton mee (dumpling noodle) stall I encountered on my exploration around the area where I stayed. I was alone, and had no clue. But then I saw Anthony Bourdain’s face plastered on the walls of this quaint noodle stall. Perfect! If Anthony enjoyed it, then I’m sure I couldn’t go very wrong.

The noodle was indeed tasty, and the soup flavorful. The humongous shrimp dumplings were fabulous as well, I think they actually fitted in two shrimps onto each dumpling! Can’t ask for a better start to my holiday.

1-wanton-mee

Super Spicy Seafood Snack

This street-side stall nearby my motel was frequently packed with locals looking for a quick snack. I ordered a small bowl just out of curiosity. Never got to know what it really was as they spoke with me in Cantonese – one of the advantages (or is it disadvantages?) of looking like one of the locals.

Some seafood stuff I suppose. Tasted great, a bit chewy. But it was extremely hot! Very very spicy, be warned! I had to grab an emergency drink right away as the spiciness caught me off guard. This snack definitely goes down well in HK’s breezy winter.

2-seafood-stuff

Late Night Supper

One of the night I had the chance to meet with an old friend and we caught up over supper of these street-side snacks – pig’s organs (I think) on the right and deep fried squids on the left. In Singapore, the pig’s organs would come serve with soup and kway chap, not served by itself like this.

I was intrigued as well to find a street soccer field in the middle of bustling Mongkok. We supped and chatted while watching a local championship battle ensue.

3-pig-orgns-n-squid

Mongkok Seafood

Again at Mongkok area, had the chance to dine at this makeshift restaurant in the middle of the street. Apparently some of the streets close at night, and these restaurants pops out of nowhere serving you such deliciousness like various seafood, hot pot rice and meat.

The clams was a personal favorite. They were cooked with chinese cooking wine, usually a Cognac XO, which gives it a unique sweetness comparable to none. I wanted to try one of the steamboat but they were full. Ah well, another time another chance.

4-streetside-resto-at-mongkok

Breakfast

One of my favorite things to do in HK was to pop by one of the many branches of Hui Lao Shan desserts stall and grab a serving of delicious mango smoothies. I would order a bowl to savor on the spot, and order another one to go. No wonder I gained so much weight!

This particular time, I pampered myself with a breakfast of egg tarts, sweet glutinious rice balls (tong yuen), and my favorite mango smoothies. The glutinious rice balls are usually served as desserts instead of breakfast, but I just couldn’t resist.

5-sweet-breakfast

Dim Sum

A trip to Hong Kong wouldn’t be complete for me without trying out their delicious dim sum. That would be like going to Phillies and missing out on their famed cheese-steaks – simply unacceptable! So I was very fortunate that a friend of mine was able to take me to this dim sum place recommended for its quality and price.

I’m glad to report that the dim sum in Hong Kong are every bit as delicious as they proclaimed to be. And doubly glad to say that I also find Singapore dim sum just as sumptuous! Featured on the photo are servings of xiao long bao (front), siu may (top right) and something else I can’t remember.

6-dim-sum

Braised Abalone

Finally, I had a luxurious dinner on my last night in Hong Kong. This dish featured here was the culmination of that dinner, the main entree – braised abalone with chinese cabbage. Apparently, this dish is right up there in the social pyramid of Chinese food, along with such delicacies as shark fin soup and birds nest soup.

7-abalone


What unique local eats have you tried before? Share in the comments!

Outside UnearthingAsia there are recent posts on local eats as well, such as Enduring Wanderlust: Authentic Local Eats and Indie Travel Podcast: Makan Time in Singapore!

You may also want to check out Foodie’s Guide to Macau by Andrew, Pho Fit for the President by Michelle, and India’s Culinary Adventures by Nabanita!

A final plug, this post is part of Photo Friday, a Blog Carnival held by Delicious Baby. Check them out for photo-sharing goodness, or take part in the carnival yourself.

About the Author. Nikolas Tjhin. A graphic and web designer in its previous incarnation, Nik’s journeyman career has seen him do work for various creative studios in Wisconsin, Minneapolis, Singapore and Jakarta. Now, he’s settled down for the time being and focusing his efforts on Unearthing Asia.

Next Page »